Legal Topics

Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 42 U.S.C. § 2000e et seq., and is a serious problem in the American workplace. During 2007 alone, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and related state agencies received 12,510 new charges of sexual...
The False Claims Act (“FCA”) is a federal law that prohibits the making of false or fraudulent claims for payment to the United States. 31 U.S.C. § 3729. The False Claims Act also protects whistleblowers who investigate or report information in furtherance of potential suits under the Act from being discharged or...
The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is a federal law designed to allow workers to take leave from their jobs to attend their own serious health conditions or those of immediate family members (child, spouse, or parent), pregnancy complications, the birth or adoption of a child or the placement of a foster child in one’s...
Federal, state and local anti-discrimination laws prohibit workplace discrimination based on an employee’s race, sex, religion, national origin, pregnancy, age, or disability. Employees working in the District of Columbia and other localities are also protected from discrimination based on their sexual orientation, family...
Prior to 1995, the United States Congress and its associated agencies in the legislative branch were exempt from the various civil rights, labor, and workplace safety and health laws that protected employees who worked in the private sector and in the federal government. In 1995, the 104th United States Congress passed the...
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in federally funded education programs and activities. Title IX protections extend to both students and employees. If you feel that you or your child is being discriminated against based on your sex by an educational institution that...
“Wrongful discharge” is often used as legal shorthand to describe something known as “wrongful termination in violation of public policy” – a sort of catch-all, judge-made rule that prohibits employers in many states from firing an employee who opposes or refuses to participate in certain unlawful or unethical activities....
In 1938 when President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), 29 U.S.C. § 201 et seq., into law, he characterized it as “the most far-reaching, far-sighted program for the benefit of workers ever adopted in this or any other country.” Over 70 years later, the FLSA remains the centerpiece of U.S....
On January 29, 2009, President Obama signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 (“Act”), superseding the Supreme Court’s decision in Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Inc., 550 U.S. 618 (2007). Ledbetter had required a compensation discrimination charge to be filed within 180 days of an employer’s decision...

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